Ucla Film Critical Essay Topic Ideas

At the age of twelve, I was deported to Ireland — by my mother. She thought the change of scenery, and some time spent with her side of the family, would be good for my overly inquisitive nature. I quickly translated her act of banishment into my own deliberate act of self-exile. In my stubborn twelve-year-old mind, this seemed more dramatic somehow. At that age, I had little wisdom and what some would call a fairly banal Irish Catholic upbringing: my father was a gifted horseman, a raging alcoholic, and a crisis-fomenting tyrant. Needless to say, home was a place I didn’t mind leaving.

I spent the next year and a half living and working on a rural farm in the Irish countryside. I studied French and Irish at St. Aloysious College, but I chose to focus on mechanical drawing, a subject that allowed me to represent a construct of my vast twelve-year-old universe. I had been seriously drawing on my own since the age of nine, and in Ireland I seized the opportunity to study drawing techniques in school, along with the complementary subjects of math and physics.

My migration from a large family in the United States to an austere and isolated farm spurred my independent, internal creative life. My aunt and uncle had no TV, no phone, and no records post-1970. Without television or neighbors for the first time in my life, I was solely responsible for my own adventures: cycling the countryside, sketching farm animals, and applying my mechanical drawing skills to restoration sketches of the family farm.

When I was away from the farm, I spent time with a large collection of cousins; almost all were involved in local theatre. Watching rehearsals for their plays, I became skilled in the art of listening and observing. I discovered an Irish imagination, imbued with a complexity of poetry, politics, humor, and history, which pervaded the works they performed on the stage. I was fascinated by the nimble play of the language, the intricacies of character, and the timing of proper silences as an element of sound. Intrigued by the “persona” of a character — the essential qualities that made a person unique — I started drawing charcoal sketches of local characters’ portraits, and I even wrote character skits and improvisations.

After I returned from my exile in Ireland, I finished high school, then earned a six-year “degree” in the national competitive cycling scene. My week-long races around the US on Greyhound’s $49.00 student fares led me to settle in Utah. There, high in the Wasatch Mountains, I retired from bicycle racing and studied painting, drawing, and printmaking (woodcut and lithography) in college. At home, I continued my oil paintings with a series of portraits. Working with friends and borrowed equipment, I wrote a short absurdist critique of the network TV coverage of the Albertville Winter Olympics. After a deluge of unforecasted snow ruined our original script, I wrote a new one in just one night. We shot our video in Park City, Utah, during the following two days of the storm, and it later won two awards in a local film festival.

After college graduation, the curiosity fueled by my childhood experiences in Ireland compelled me to travel, so I joined the Peace Corps ten days after commencement. I arrived in Morocco, where I had the opportunity to design the English program at the FSTM, a brand-new science and technology university. The students there came from a language-study background of translating and transcribing. They knew perfectly well how to conjugate verbs, but they would fall silent when asked for the time of day. With no available textbooks or traditional teaching aids, I created a series of courses using theater, video, drama, and debate as in an experimental approach to teaching English.

Outside of teaching, Peace Corps volunteers are required to create “secondary projects.” When the Peace Corps Washington selected a script that I had written for a safety training video, I was chosen for the lead role. My success in this project led to another work opportunity, this time with the Moroccan Educational Institute for Radio and Television. Over a year and a half, we wrote and developed an eight-minute pilot episode for a series using English-language TV time as a means to address current issues in Morocco. We worked with Japanese technicians in French, an Iranian director in Arabic, and an English-speaking writing staff to produce a pilot that would pass strict censorship standards and still remain entertaining to our viewers. Later on, other projects brought me back to the drawing board — literally — illustrating USAID-funded health manuals for Peace Corps Volunteer projects.

Before finishing my service as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Morocco, I wrote a series of staged events that I planned to examine in a video essay, or mock-umentary. My objective, at the time, was to exploit the naiveté of Americans overseas, those gullible new volunteers who were willing to swallow a sword just to scratch their stomachs. On the surface, the resulting film was a humorous and caustic treatise on American values and group identity. But the summer-long exercise of setting up, shooting, exhibiting, and discussing the video spurred me to explore my own roles as project creator, actor, and outside commentator.

Once I had completed my Peace Corps service, I headed north to a teaching post in Paris. As fate would have it, my office was two blocks from the Cinematheque francaise. Here, I spent the majority of my first wet winter days, mingling with a group of young video-makers who were exploring similar questions of identity. I began work on a series of large format portraits, using 35mm prints on canvas. I completed my first commissioned photo in 1998.

Since 1999 I’ve been working a day job in Kafkaesque environs, writing appeals and legal petitions. Meanwhile, I’ve begun another project, a portrait of a unique and gifted man, James Donaldson. I wanted to create a video narrative that would address serious social issues in an indirect and poetic manner. As the subject of my current investigation into character and truth, James’ life and music have forced me, as a storyteller, to confront my own technical limitations. James spent his youth in American juvenile orphanages after witnessing, at the age of five, his own father brutally murdering his mother. Thirteen years later, he met his father again, both men prisoners in the same penitentiary. James rose to fame and prominence as a Billboard recording artist with Chess Records, and, now, at age sixty-two, he fights a battle with homelessness.

This project, which has consumed my life for the last three years, has enabled me to develop my own voice and to explore my role as the storyteller of my own work — whether the story is about a town or another man. Ever since my early childhood encounters with farm animals and Irish theatrical characters, I have looked for places to store the lives of the people I meet. I think of my drawings and photographs as the preliminary sketches for my films and videos, which are, essentially, concerned with truth. Not reality or even facts, necessarily, but the kind of truth that only art seems to address, truth that connects with the essentials of human experience. At UCLA’s MFA program in film production, I will develop a palette of techniques and refined skills vital to a professional, independent storyteller. For this is, in fact, what I am. I examine social issues through investigation of identity and community, adding texture to my own life as an active participant in the collaborative imagination of my generation.

While my desire to study film at UCLA is quite specific, my motivation comes from a wide spectrum of creative and social experiences, including my travels to Morocco, Paris, Ireland, and the United States. UCLA, with its production and documentary program, including the Marina Goldovskaya Documentary Salon Series, is a school that will nurture my diverse experiences and my single-minded creative visions, while also rigorously challenging me to grow as a technical filmmaker and creative thinker.

 

How to Enroll

For more information about our courses and to register, click on www.registrar.ucla.edu.

 

FILM, TELEVISION & DIGITAL MEDIA COURSES FOR SPRING 2018

Click through the class name to see the course description on the Registrar's website.

 

1C / Freshman Symposium
Laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 1B. Limited to Film and Television majors. Structured forum in which freshmen meet on regular basis to discuss curricular issues, meet with faculty members from department, and have exposure to array of guest speakers from media industries. Letter grading.


4 / Introduction to Art and Technique of Filmmaking
(Formerly numbered 122B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Students acquire understanding of practical and aesthetic challenges undertaken by artists and professionals in making of motion pictures and television. Examination of film as both art and industry: storytelling, sound and visual design, casting and performance, editing, finance, advertising, and distribution. Exploration of American and world cinema from filmmaker's perspective. Honing of analytical skills and development of critical vocabulary for study of filmmaking as technical, artistic, and cultural phenomenon. P/NP or letter grading.


6A / History of American Motion Picture
(Formerly numbered 106A.) Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Historical and critical survey, with examples, of American motion picture both as developing art form and as medium of mass communication. Letter grading.


10A / American Television History
(Formerly numbered 110A.) Lecture/screenings, five hours; discussion, one hour. Critical survey of American television history from its inception to present. Examination of interrelationships between program forms, industrial paradigms, social trends, and culture. Starting with television's hybrid origins in radio, theater, and film, contextualization, viewing, and discussion of key television shows, as well as Hollywood films that comment on radio and television. Consideration of television programs and series in terms of sociocultural issues (consumerism, lifestyle, gender, race, national identity) and industrial practice (programming, policy, regulation, business). Letter grading.


19 / Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars
Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.


33 / Introductory Screenwriting
(Formerly numbered 133.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course C132/C430. Structural analysis of feature films and development of professional screenwriters' vocabulary for constructing, deconstructing, and reconstructing their own work. Screenings of films and selected film sequences in class and by assignment. P/NP or letter grading.


52 / Cinematography
(Formerly numbered 150.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 1A. Limited to Film and Television majors. Introduction to motion imaging photography for thorough understanding of fundamental tools and principles of cinematography to create images that support and enhance story of film, achieve comprehension of principles of motion imaging photography through lectures, discussions, and screenings, develop skills of cinematographer by shooting exercises during laboratory period, and acquire appreciation of art of cinematography. Language and skills of image construction provided, as well as image analysis and deconstruction. Letter grading.


84A / Overview of Contemporary Film Industry
(Formerly numbered 184A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of evolving economic structures and business practices in contemporary Hollywood film industry, with emphasis on operations of studios and independent distribution companies, their development, marketing, and distribution systems, and their relationship to independent producers, talent, and agencies. Letter grading.


98TB / Going Viral: Zombies, Viruses, End of World
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Movies, television shows, and books are filled with zombie viruses, bioengineered plagues, and disease-ravaged bands of survivors. Analysis of why outbreak narratives have infected our public discourse and how they have affected way Americans view world. Letter grading.


102C / Senior Symposium
Laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 102B. Limited to Film and Television majors. Structured forum in which seniors meet on regular basis to discuss curricular issues, meet with faculty members, and have exposure to array of guest speakers from within film and television industry. Letter grading.


106C / History of African, Asian, and Latin American Film
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Critical, historical, aesthetic, and social study -- together with exploration of ethnic significance -- of Asian, African, Latin American, and Mexican films. Letter grading.


C118 / Intermediate Cinematography
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Intermediate study of principles of cinematography, with emphasis on exposure, lighting, and selection of film, camera, and lenses. Concurrently scheduled with course C416. Letter grading.


122D / Film Editing: Overview of History, Technique, and Practice
Lecture, three hours. Practical application of film editing techniques, how they have evolved, and continue to evolve. Examination of history of editing, as well as current editing trends, terminology, and workflow. P/NP or letter grading.


122E / Digital Cinematography
Lecture, three hours. With lectures, screenings, and demonstrations, study of principles of digital cinematography. How tools and techniques affect visual storytelling process. Topics include formats, aspect ratios, cameras, lenses, special effects, internal menu picture manipulation, lighting, composition, coverage, high definition, digital exhibition, filtration, multiple-camera shooting. P/NP or letter grading.


122M / Film and Television Directing
Lecture, three hours. Through discussions, screenings, demonstrations, and guests, exploration of script, previsualization, directing actors, directing camera coverage in relationship to story, practical on-set directing, and directing for camera. P/NP or letter grading.


122N / History of Animation in American Film and Television
Lecture, six hours. Survey of art of animation in America from its precinema origins to recent films of Disney, Pixar, DreamWorks, Ghibli, and others. Place of animation in pop culture, racial imagery and ethnic stereotypes, growth of art form, and how it reflects American society. P/NP or letter grading.


134 / Intermediate Screenwriting Workshop
Seminar, three hours. Problems in film and television writing. P/NP or letter grading.


135C / Advanced Screenwriting Workshop
Laboratory, three hours. Requisite: course 135B. Limited to Film and Television majors. Designed for seniors. Course in film and television writing. Third act of original screenplay to be developed. Letter grading.


146 / Art and Practice of Motion Picture Producing
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of role of producer as both artist and business person. Comparative analysis of screenplays and completed films. Emphasis on assembly of creative team and analysis of industrial context, both independent and studio. Screenings viewed outside of class and on reserve at Powell Library. Letter grading.


C148 / Advanced Digital Media Workgroup
Laboratory, two hours; discussion, four hours. Designed for students with previous laboratory course experience to provide opportunity to create larger-scale digital media works with advanced software tools and techniques in small process-oriented, creative workshop environment. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C248. Letter grading.


153 / Motion Picture Lighting
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 52, 101A, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Introduction to principles and tools of lighting used in visual storytelling through lectures, discussions, and screenings. Creative lighting techniques covering topics such as people, environment, spatial relationships, movement, color, special effects, and continuity. Letter grading.


178 / Film and Television Production Laboratory
Laboratory, to be arranged. Supervised laboratory experience in various aspects of film and television production. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units, but only 8 units may be applied toward Film and Television major. Letter grading.


C181A / Introduction to Animation
(Formerly numbered 181A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Drawing experience not required. Fundamentals of animation through preparation of short animated film. Concurrently scheduled with course C481A. P/NP or letter grading.


C181C / Animation Workshop
(Formerly numbered 181C.) Studio, six hours. Preparation: storyboard at first class meeting. Requisite: course C181A. Organization and integration of various creative arts used in animation to form complete study of selected topic. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Concurrently scheduled with course C481C. P/NP or letter grading.


183C / Producing III: Marketing, Distribution, and Exhibition
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Open to nonmajors. Marketing and distribution of feature films across multiple exhibition platforms and subsequent reception and consumption by audiences. Focus on engagement between distributor, exhibitor, and audience and analysis of various conceptual frameworks and industrial strategies within which these relationships are conceived and operate. May be taken independently for credit. Letter grading.


185 / Intermediate Undergraduate Film Production
Laboratory, six hours. Requisites: courses 52, 154, 155, 163. Limited to Film and Television majors. Instruction and exercises in all stages of film production. Letter grading.


C186C / Advanced Documentary Workshop
(Formerly numbered 186C.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, four to six hours. Requisite: course C186B. Advanced viewing and discussion of selected documentaries and instruction in various production skills necessary to create video documentaries. Completion of series of exercises from conceptualization through postproduction, culminating in production of short documentary. Concurrently scheduled with course C403C. Letter grading.


188A / Special Courses in Film, Television, and Digital Media
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Special topics in film, television, and digital media for undergraduate students taught on experimental or temporary basis. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.


194 / Internship Seminars: Film, Television, and Digital Media
Seminar, two hours. Corequisite: course 195. Designed for students currently in departmental internships. General introduction to contemporary film and television industries and discussion and engagement with and expansion on internship experiences. Common business practices and expansion of critical understanding of industry at large. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.


195 / Corporate Internships in Film, Television, and Digital Media
Tutorial, one hour; fieldwork, 12 hours. Enforced corequisite: course 194. Limited to juniors/seniors. Corporate internship in supervised setting in business related to film, television, and digital media industries. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.


199 / Directed Research or Senior Project in Film, Television, and Digital Media
Tutorial, three hours. Limited to senior Film and Television majors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be taken for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.


203 / Seminar: Film and Other Arts
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Studies in interrelationships between film and fine arts, or performing arts, or literature, with emphasis on ways these other arts have influenced film. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U or letter grading.


206B / Seminar: Selected Topics in American Film History
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Seminar with focus on specific topic or period in American film history. Letter grading.


211B / Seminar: Historiography
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Limited to Film and Television Ph.D. candidates. Examination of function and methods of writing film and television history as exemplified by key works in this tradition, with attention to central issues of historical thought on media. S/U or letter grading.


212 / Cinema and Media Studies Graduate Colloquium
Lecture, two hours. Exchange with scholars inside and outside department through lectures and academic paper presentation and offers students practice in presenting papers for professional conferences, CV writing seminars, job market/interview preparation seminars, and discussion of current topics and trajectory of area of cinema and media studies. May be repeated for maximum of 14 units. S/U grading.


213 / Capstone Seminar
Seminar, three hours. Limited to Film and Television M.A. candidates. Capstone course for cinema and media studies master's program. Students write, revise, and present comprehensive essay on preapproved topic derived from their M.A. coursework. Letter grading.


217A / Seminar: American Television History
Seminar, three hours; screenings, four hours. Critical survey of U.S. television industry from its inception to present. Examination of programming and changes within industry by considering range of technological, economic, aesthetic, social, and cultural dimensions. Letter grading.


218 / Seminar: Culture, Media, and Society
Seminar, three hours; screenings/discussion, four hours. Emphasis on discourse of other(s). Thematization of other is concerned with theories of difference rather than similarity or identity -- with how other cultures enter into politics of representation and representation of politics through metaphors of (1) difference without opposition, (2) heterogeneity without hierarchy, and/or (3) otherness without ethnocentrism. Examination of how women, national minorities, and Third World peoples have been rendered others; place of cinematic apparatus in this process and how academization of others is positioned vis-à-vis mainstream critical discourse. Letter grading.


219 / Seminar: Film and Society
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of ways film affects and is affected by social behavior, belief, and value systems; considered in relation to role of media in society. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.


273 / Seminar: Contemporary Film and Television Criticism
Seminar, three hours; film and television screenings, four to six hours. Limited to Film and Television Ph.D. candidates. Study and practice of analytic and critical response, with emphasis on contemporary film and television. S/U or letter grading.


274 / Seminar: Research Design
Seminar, three hours. Designed for second-year Film and Television Ph.D. students. Examination of general principles that govern formulation of major research projects and preparation of prospectus for Ph.D. dissertation. S/U or letter grading.


283B / Writing Half-Hour Comedy Pilot and Series Bible
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 283A. Examination of basics of half-hour pilot format, style, and content, and learning of principles behind network needs and choices in choosing pilots. Workshop in which to discuss ideas and issues with class and instructor. Weekly progress on original half-hour pilot and series bible required. Letter grading.


283C / Running Television Comedy Room
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 283A. Practical knowledge about skills necessary to be writer/executive producer of half-hour comedy show. Focus on community building, collaboration, and leadership skills needed to successfully function in writers' room, as well as breaking stories, writing, and rewriting television scripts. Letter grading.


284B / Writing One-Hour Drama Pilot and Series Bible
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 284A. Examination of basics of drama pilot format, style, and content, and learning of principles behind network needs and choices in choosing pilots. Workshop in which to discuss ideas and issues with class and instructor. Weekly progress on original drama pilot and series bible required. Letter grading.


284C / Running Television Drama Room
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 284A. Practical knowledge about skills necessary to be writer/executive producer of one-hour drama show. Focus on community building, collaboration, and leadership skills needed to successfully function in writers' room, as well as breaking stories, writing, and rewriting television scripts. Letter grading.


287C / Introduction to Art and Business of Producing III
Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 287A, 287B. Builds on principles taught in courses 287A and 287B. Presentation of screenplays prepared in course 287B for review by class and instructor with goal of isolating and identifying primary and secondary thesis projects. Discussions of script analysis and creating set of viable development notes for primary projects. Completion of written outline for original projects and pitching of primary projects to panel of industry executives for further feedback. S/U or letter grading.


289A / Current Business Practices in Film and Television
Discussion, three hours. Requisite: course C247. Designed for graduate students. Examination of current status of financing/production/distribution agreements, union agreements, music, copyright, etc., necessary to understand film and television industry. S/U or letter grading.


290C / Research and Development III
Seminar, three hours. Final stages of thesis preparation for evaluation. Guidance provided by instructor on how to effectively present selected project. Requirements include industry-related book reports, script analysis, pitching selected concept, weekly research to understand marketplace, accumulation and updating of data, and justification for potential buyers comprised of industry professionals. S/U or letter grading.


291C / Feature Film Distribution and Exhibition
Lecture, three hours. Course 291B is not requisite to 291C. Investigation of philosophy, structure, and major players that make up entertainment industry, with emphasis on film distribution and exhibition. Through lectures, readings, and guest speakers, exploration of interrelated arenas of production, marketing, business affairs, media, and impact of international market on distribution and exhibition of studio releases. S/U or letter grading.


294A / Contracts and Negotiation
Lecture, three hours. Survey of range of contracts involved in studio productions, including literary submission and option agreements, artist employment, director employment, writer collaboration agreements, coproduction agreements, music rights license, etc. Actual studio agreements referenced to illuminate potential consequences of each transaction. Negotiation strategy exercises. S/U or letter grading.


294C / International Financing and Distribution
Lecture, three hours. Course 294B is not requisite to 294C. Legal-based course dealing with independent finance and distribution of feature films. Topics include fundamentals of film financing, domestic distribution, international distribution, European coproductions, role of foreign sales agents and of bankers and completion bond companies. S/U or letter grading.


295A / Art of Presentation
Lecture, three hours. Cultivation of skills needed for students to present themselves and their project goals with clarity and precision to industry professionals. Oral presentations designed to enhance student ability to deliver convincing arguments on range of topics. S/U or letter grading.


295C / Advanced Producing: Role of Successful Producer
Lecture, three hours. Designed to provide producers with comprehensive understanding of business acumen involved in purchasing scripts for studios and independent production companies. Through script analysis and in-class discussions, students encouraged to examine not just story elements, but marketing assets inherent in pieces of material. S/U or letter grading.


297C / Digital Media Producing 3
Seminar, three hours. Overview of changing world of storytelling through development of new technologies and new media. Development of short teaser trailer or website using digital and web-based resources to promote student original digital media project proposal. S/U or letter grading.


298A / Special Studies in Film and Television
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Seminar study of problems in film and television, organized on topic basis. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.


375 / Teaching Apprentice Practicum
Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.


C403C / Advanced Documentary Workshop
(Formerly numbered 403C.) Lecture/discussion/laboratory, 16 to 24 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 409, 410A, 410B, 410C, 433. Limited to graduate film and television students. Production of advanced individual documentary film or video projects. Students conceptualize, research, write, shoot (on location), and edit projects to completion. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with courses C186C. S/U or letter grading.


405 / Digital Image Manipulation on Set and Post
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisite: course 410B. Students achieve greater understanding and command of tools and techniques of color correction and matte photography (both on set and in post production) through lectures, discussions, workshops, and screenings. Increases student's appreciation and skill set in art of digital image manipulation in cinematography. May be repeated once for credit. Letter grading.


407 / Video Documentary Workshop
Laboratory, 12 hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Exploration of documentary video, including screening variety of international works and producing short documentary project using single-camera field production techniques. S/U or letter grading.


408B / Avid Editing 2
Studio, four hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Individual instruction in Avid nonlinear editing system. S/U or letter grading.


410A / Symposium
Seminar, three hours. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Exploration of principal concepts of film and television production within context of preproduction, production, and postproduction, providing forum for synthesis of knowledge gained in various first-year technical craft courses. Exploration of strategies for learning production within academic environment. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.


410C / Postproduction
Seminar, three hours. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Production workshop designed to give hands-on experience in all aspects of film production (tools and practicum of medium) as each student writes/directs/edits six-minute film. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.


410D / Postproduction Sound
Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 405, 409. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Technical and aesthetic aspects of postproduction sound recording, editing, and rerecording for film and television. Application of principles of sound design to student films while using UCLA's John Candy Room and Scoring Stage for Automatic Dialogue Replacement (ADR), Foley, and mixing. Use of Pro Tools LE for recording, editing, and mixing, selection and use of microphones and mixing consoles, and incorporation of Final Cut Pro soundtracks into mix environment. Students record ADR and Foley and present mix of edited dialogue/ADR, Foley, sfx, and music tracks by end of term. Letter grading.


C416 / Intermediate Cinematography
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Intermediate study of principles of cinematography, with emphasis on exposure, lighting, and selection of film, camera, and lenses. Concurrently scheduled with course C118. Letter grading.


423B / Advanced Direction of Actors for Film and Television
Studio laboratory, six hours. Requisite: course 423A. Limited to graduate film and television students. Advanced study and practice of directing actors before camera. Emphasis on developing techniques to immediately enhance communication between director and actor on set in order to maintain continuity from shot to shot. S/U or letter grading.


431 / Introduction to Film and Television Screenwriting
Lecture, three hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Introductory course in problems of film and television screenwriting. S/U or letter grading.


434 / Advanced Screenwriting
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 431. Advanced problems in writing of original film and television screenplays. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.


453 / Postproduction Sound Design
Lecture, three hours. Designed to give film students insight into world of postproduction sound and to provide knowledge and tools necessary to complete postwork on their projects. Exploration of all areas of postproduction sound design from editing to final mixing. How to effectively use sound design to enhance storytelling capability of films, evaluate music choices, pick composer, music edit, create sound design to enhance story points, discover design opportunities, and select right sound effects. How to edit dialogue, prep for Automatic Dialogue Replacement and Foley sessions, and supervise final sound mix. Screening of numerous film clips to provide examples of postsound choices that demonstrate effective use of sound design. S/U or letter grading.


C454B / Advanced Film Editing
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: submission of rough cut of existing project or proposal to edit work of another director. Limited to film and television students in postproduction phase with advanced knowledge of organization and operation of postproduction process. Students may also propose to edit significant scene given to them by instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C154B. Letter grading.


C481A / Introduction to Animation
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Drawing experience not required. Fundamentals of animation through preparation of short animated film. Concurrently scheduled with course C181A. S/U or letter grading.


C481C / Animation Workshop
Studio, six hours. Preparation: storyboard at first class meeting. Requisite: course C181A. Organization and integration of various creative arts used in animation to form complete study of selected topic. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Concurrently scheduled with course C181C. S/U or letter grading.


483C / Advanced Computer Animation
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 483B. Creation and production of complete and original advanced computer animated film. Letter grading.


489A / Computer Animation in Film and Video
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four to eight hours; other, to be arranged. Preparation: completed animated film. Requisites: courses 181A, 181C. Instruction in and supervised production of computer animation. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Letter grading.


495A / Practice of Teaching Film and Television
Seminar, three hours. Required of all teaching assistants and associates in critical studies program. Orientation and preparation of graduate students who have responsibility to assist in teaching undergraduate courses in department; discussion of problems common to teaching experience. S/U grading.


498 / Professional Internship in Film and Television
Tutorial, to be arranged. Full- or part-time at studio or on professional project. Designed for M.F.A. program advanced students. Internship at various film, television, or theater facilities accentuating creative contribution, organization, and work of professionals in their various specialties. Given only when projects can be scheduled. S/U or letter grading.


501 / Cooperative Program
Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: consent of graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.


596A / Directed Individual Studies: Research
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.


596B / Directed Individual Studies: Writing
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.


596C / Directed Individual Studies: Directing
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.


596F / Directed Individual Studies: Production
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.


597 / Preparation for Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations in Film and Television
Tutorial, to be arranged. May be taken for maximum of 12 units. S/U grading.


599 / Ph.D. Dissertation in Film and Television
Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: advancement to Ph.D. candidacy. Research and writing for Ph.D. dissertation. May be repeated. S/U grading.


 

Financial Aid

Financial aid for Summer Sessions Institutes is available to qualified UCLA students. All other students should inquire about financial aid at their home institution. For details about the financial aid application process, please visit the Financial Aid section of summer.ucla.edu.

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